AFC Bournemouth v Middlesbrough

#1
Woodgate’s Home Town Clash

After the international break our side get back to the bread and butter football with nine games to go. They are just outside the play-off positions, but only three points behind with a game in hand. Our last Championship game was at Dean Court against fellow promotion hopefuls Swansea City, the Cherries won 3-0. Our next game is at Dean Court again at 3 pm on Good Friday, which is the start of a busy Easter period.

Our opponents travelling down from the North East are Middlesbrough the area where Jonathan Woodgate was born, played for the club and was manager, so this game will add a bit of extra spice against the Boro manager who took over from him, Neil Warnock. In the Cherries first away game of the season, the game ended in a 1-1 draw our goal coming from Dominic Solanke in the first half, Boro equalised through Marcus Browne in the second half.

Middlesbrough, nickname the Boro, themselves are just outside the play-off positions, sitting in 9th position and 6 points off the last play-off spot, but with a poorer GD to Reading who occupy it. Talking of Boro, I wondered why it has two o’s and the place name has only one, it seems from what I gather, it comes from a spelling mistake by the town clerk at the time who omitted an o, so instead of Middlesborough, it was spelt Middlesbrough as the name is today.

The Boro are sitting in the halfway spot in the away table with 23 points after 19 games, they have W 6, D 5, L 8. At the halfway stage of the season after 23 games, Middlesbrough were in 7th place with 36 points, AFCB were in 3rd place with 42 points but played one game more. In their last 6 away games they have beaten both Reading 0-2 and Coventry City 1-2. Drew 0-0 at Norwich and lost 2-1 to Derby County and Swansea City. In their last game against Millwall, it finished 1-0.

The last time we played against Middlesbrough at Dean Court in a league match was in AFCB’s second season in the Premier League, the Cherries won 4-0. The Cherries were 2-0 up after 16 minutes with goals from Josh King and Benik Afobe. Gaston Ramirez picked up a second yellow card after 20 minutes and left Middlesbrough with 10 men for the rest of the game. The Cherries scored a further 2 goals in the second half from Marc Pugh and Charlie Daniels.
In our home league games against Middlesbrough, AFCB have W 3, D 4, L 0.
All competitions, AFCB have W 4, D 8, L 7.

AFCB Team News
Apart from Lewis Cook, Jonathan Woodgate will have the other players who have been out injured back for selection.

AFCB Player To Watch
Arnaut Danjuma, scored 3 goals in his last 3 league games and also had 2 assists.

Middlesbrough Team News
They seem to have a full squad to choose from.

Middlesbrough Player To Watch
Yannick Bolasie brought in on loan at the end of the January transfer window from Everton.
 
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#2
Talking of Boro, I wondered why it has two o’s and the place name has only one, it seems from what I gather, it comes from a spelling mistake by the town clerk at the time who omitted an o, so instead of Middlesborough, it was spelt Middlesbrough as the name is today.
There is no evidence whatsoever to support that story.

There is an Anglo-Saxon suffix -burh which is represented in southern English place names. However, being in the north, it is likely the Old Norse suffix, which survives as -borg in Danish and Swedish today, provides the borough part of the place name.* Not that it matters. Old Norse and Anglo-Saxon had a great deal of shared vocabulary and it is essentially the same word.

-Borg and -burh had various spellings that survive in Britain as -borough (Scarborough), -burgh (Edingburgh), -bury (Salisbury) as well as brough.*

The first version of the name was recorded at Whitby Abbey in 686 as Mydilsburgh. It is not listed in the Domesday Book, though. Midlesburc didn't surface again until c.1165, becoming Middelburg by 1272 (Ekwall 1987 p324).

Never mind all that, the story goes that the misspelling was at the time of receiving the town charter in 1853. Great story. However, the Middlesbrough and Redcar Railway Company dates from 1846.





*For completists, the Oxford English Dictionary lists the following variations of the spelling of Borough:-

1 burᴁ, buruᴁ, 1–3 burh, 2 burch, bure(g)h, (burehg), beriȝ, 2–3 buruh, 3 burrh (Orm.), burwe, buri, 3–4 burȝ, buruȝ, borh, borȝ, boruȝ, boru, 4 burw, burȝe, borȝ(e, bourȝ, borou, borwȝ, borwgh, borw(e, borgh(e, 4–5 burghe, 4–6 (also Sc. 7–9) burgh, borogh, 4–7 borowe, 5 burwgh, borowgh, burwhe, borugh(e, burwe, bourg, 5–6 bourgh, 5–7 burrow(e, 6 borrowe, (bourg), burow, 6–7 boroughe, 6–8 burrough, (7 burrowghe, 8 borrough), 6– borough. dat. sing. 1 byriᴁ, burᴁe, 2 birie, berie, 3 biri, burie, buri.
 
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#3
There is no evidence whatsoever to support that story.

There is an Anglo-Saxon suffix -burh which is represented in southern English place names. However, being in the north, it is more likely the Old Norse suffix, which survives as -borg in Danish and Swedish today, that was the original place name.*

-Borg and -burh had various spellings that survive in Britain as -borough (Scarborough), -burgh (Edingburgh), -bury (Salisbury) as well as brough.*

The first version of the name was recorded at Whitby Abbey in 686 as Mydilsburgh. But is not listed in the Domesday Book.

Never mind all that, the story goes that the misspelling was at the time of receiving the town charter in 1853. Great story. However the Middlesbrough and Redcar Railway Company dates from 1846.





*For completists, the Oxford English Dictionary lists the following variations of the spelling of Borough:-

1 burᴁ, buruᴁ, 1–3 burh, 2 burch, bure(g)h, (burehg), beriȝ, 2–3 buruh, 3 burrh (Orm.), burwe, buri, 3–4 burȝ, buruȝ, borh, borȝ, boruȝ, boru, 4 burw, burȝe, borȝ(e, bourȝ, borou, borwȝ, borwgh, borw(e, borgh(e, 4–5 burghe, 4–6 (also Sc. 7–9) burgh, borogh, 4–7 borowe, 5 burwgh, borowgh, burwhe, borugh(e, burwe, bourg, 5–6 bourgh, 5–7 burrow(e, 6 borrowe, (bourg), burow, 6–7 boroughe, 6–8 burrough, (7 burrowghe, 8 borrough), 6– borough. dat. sing. 1 byriᴁ, burᴁe, 2 birie, berie, 3 biri, burie, buri.
Yep, know all those from various sites.

But personally prefer the rumour/old wives tale one which depicts human error which we know happens, but back then they couldn’t blame it on computer error like these days. ;)
 
#4
Yep, know all those from various sites.
Except that the info from the OED is not published online. You must have a much more powerful version of the interweb than is available to most mortals.

But personally prefer the rumour/old wives tale one which depicts human error which we know happens, but back then they couldn’t blame it on computer error like these days. ;)
Never let the facts get in the way of a good story, eh?
 
#6
I didn't. I researched. Some of us still read books and don't just google everything or look at Wikipedia.

As for this:

“The latter syllable of the name Middlesbrough suggests the existence of some Roman post on the site, such a feature frequently occurring under the appellation of burgh or brough” But historians are still to find evidence to back up the Roman theory.

The Romans never used any variation of borg or burh.
 
#15
There is no evidence whatsoever to support that story.

There is an Anglo-Saxon suffix -burh which is represented in southern English place names. However, being in the north, it is more likely the Old Norse suffix, which survives as -borg in Danish and Swedish today, that was the original place name.*

-Borg and -burh had various spellings that survive in Britain as -borough (Scarborough), -burgh (Edingburgh), -bury (Salisbury) as well as brough.*

The first version of the name was recorded at Whitby Abbey in 686 as Mydilsburgh. But is not listed in the Domesday Book.

Never mind all that, the story goes that the misspelling was at the time of receiving the town charter in 1853. Great story. However the Middlesbrough and Redcar Railway Company dates from 1846.





*For completists, the Oxford English Dictionary lists the following variations of the spelling of Borough:-

1 burᴁ, buruᴁ, 1–3 burh, 2 burch, bure(g)h, (burehg), beriȝ, 2–3 buruh, 3 burrh (Orm.), burwe, buri, 3–4 burȝ, buruȝ, borh, borȝ, boruȝ, boru, 4 burw, burȝe, borȝ(e, bourȝ, borou, borwȝ, borwgh, borw(e, borgh(e, 4–5 burghe, 4–6 (also Sc. 7–9) burgh, borogh, 4–7 borowe, 5 burwgh, borowgh, burwhe, borugh(e, burwe, bourg, 5–6 bourgh, 5–7 burrow(e, 6 borrowe, (bourg), burow, 6–7 boroughe, 6–8 burrough, (7 burrowghe, 8 borrough), 6– borough. dat. sing. 1 byriᴁ, burᴁe, 2 birie, berie, 3 biri, burie, buri.
Entirely off topic but I love stuff like this!

Anyways...another big game in a string of big games. The question is will we turn up? A break from games and a good stint in training for many of our players, plus one or two returning from injury, all the ingredients should be there for a positive display. Sadly been bitten by that kind of thinking before though.
 
#18
like a lot of our great towns & cities, its a fascinating area & well worth exploring
We were booked to come up that way for a fortnight a few years ago, but circumstances at that time meant we had to cancel.

Was going to be one week lower down and the other higher up near the Kielder Forest in the Northumberland area.